Обзор лучших ресурсов по разработке бренда, разработке упаковки

contact us | ok@ohmycode.ru

28/09/2018

Friday Likes 261

Friday Likes 261
 
 

a

b

c

An elegant and richly produced range of projects this week, with work from Firenze, Melbourne, and Los Angeles.

Mutti Limited Edition by Auge Design

Mutti Limited Edition by Auge Design

Mutti is a brand of canned tomatoes and other tomato-based products based in Italy and founded in 1899. For their presence at FICO Eataly World, a “food theme park” in Bologna, Mutti prepared a limited edition range of some of their products. Designed by Firenze-based Auge Design, the packaging includes a series of the best canned tomatoes you will ever see, with abstracted tomatoes in the background layered with beautiful gold typography and graphics — it’s kind of amazing that they are basically the same elements found on the everyday Mutti packaging. The sauce and concentrate packaging are also quite nice but the cans steal the show. See full project

Future Future by A Friend of Mine

Future Future by A Friend of Mine

Future Future is a Japanese restaurant “filtered through Melbourne eyes” located in the suburb of Richmond, Victoria. The identity, designed by Melbourne-based A Friend of Mine, features a vertical, monospace logo in a funky bold sans serif that is probably not much to look at as a flat graphic but it has been amazingly translated into a chrome-plated, 3D-printed lettering that sits on the window of the small restaurant. While that would be enough, the logo is also made into fuzzy letters for the staff. I want both things, badly. A secondary element is a bitmap pattern that I’m not sure what its concept is but that nonetheless looks great on the window, as the chopstick sleeves, and as tissue paper to serve some of the food. Can you spot the “FUTURE” woven into the pattern? See full project

Dear Mayuko by Daikoku Design Institute

Dear Mayuko by Daikoku Design Institute

Dear Mayuko is a cosmetics and beauty brand with five retail stores in Japan. Its main distinction from other beauty products is that theirs are made with ceresin, a natural moisturizing component found in silkworm cocoons and it’s the shape of these that drives the identity and packaging designed by Los Angeles, CA- and Tokyo-based Daikoku Design Institute. Wether used as a single element, rearranged to form faces, used as a window to place other patterns, or as pattern themselves, the wobbly ovals create a unified, soft look across multiple categories of products. If the soft color palette and delicate typography are any indication, I’m switching to these products and away from my Tide-based beauty treatments. See full project