ok@ohmycode.ru

25/01/2017

The League of Extraordinary Ribbons

about

(Est. 2005) “The A-League is a professional men’s soccer league run by Football Federation Australia (FFA). At the top of the Australian league system, it is the country’s primary competition for the sport. The A-League was established in 2004 as a successor to the National Soccer League (NSL) and competition commenced in August 2005. The league is currently contested by ten teams; nine based in Australia and one based in New Zealand. It is known as the Hyundai A-League (HAL) through a sponsorship arrangement with the Hyundai Motor Company.” Three years later in 2008 the FFA introduced the women’s Westfield W-League and Foxtel National Youth League as the youth developmental and reserve league.(Wikipedia)

design by

Hulsbosch (Sydney, Australia)

related links

A-League press release

Creatively, the modernised football icon at the centre of all three league’s logo is inspired by football's three points of difference - atmosphere, diversity and unity. The focus is to highlight these points of difference to drive growth across the Hyundai A-League, Westfield W-League and Foxtel Y-League.

For the first time in Australian sport, the league identity will assume the colours of Clubs within all Club communications to further showcase the importance of bringing the league and Clubs closer - under the one brand banner.

Hulsbosch provided text

opinion/notes

According to Wikipedia (which links to an old A-League press release not available anymore), the old logo was constructed of eight abstract "A"s, one for each of the teams. I'm glad I looked because my interpretation of eight rusty boomerangs was not as good. Needless to say, it wasn't a great logo… too volcanic, or something. The sponsor logo integration was okay in the A-League but ghastly on the other two. The weird typography, despite being weird, was probably the best thing it had going in its favor. The icon in the new logo aims to capture "football's three points of difference - atmosphere, diversity and unity"… Yeah, no. I mean, yes, sure, it's three elements and the ribbon-like appearance conveys softness while the lock-up hints ay unity, but it's far from an immediate read. I almost like the icon… but the "material" choice for the three elements is weird: is it plastic? Artificial finger nails? I would have liked to see something more interesting or more deliberate as opposed to this mystery render. The sponsor lock-ups are much better resolved and they stand out nicely in white. The new wordmark is okay, but the sliced "E" is weird. I get it as a space-saving solution but that poor "E" never saw it coming. The color variations to match the team colors do the icon no favors, making it look awkward in most instances once the shading has been removed and, when placed in uniforms, it blends in so well that it completely disappears. Overall, an improvement mostly because the old one was so weird but questionable in some instances.

New Logos for the A-League, W-League, and Y-League by Hulsbosch
A-League logo.
New Logos for the A-League, W-League, and Y-League by Hulsbosch
New Logos for the A-League, W-League, and Y-League by Hulsbosch
W-League and Y-League logos, before and after.
New Logos for the A-League, W-League, and Y-League by Hulsbosch
New family of logos.
New Logos for the A-League, W-League, and Y-League by Hulsbosch
Logo on a ball.
New Logos for the A-League, W-League, and Y-League by Hulsbosch
Logo in a stadium.
New Logos for the A-League, W-League, and Y-League by Hulsbosch
App icon.
New Logos for the A-League, W-League, and Y-League by Hulsbosch
The logo in each of the league’s team’s colors.
New Logos for the A-League, W-League, and Y-League by Hulsbosch
On uniforms.
Logo presentation.

Thanks to Vu Nguyen for the tip.